Archive for Peace

A request to help a film maker friend of mine

My dearest friend, my Vietnamese brother, was eight years old when a stray bomb from an American B-52 killed three generations of his family when it landed in his village. He lived as an orphan during the rest of the war and escaped by boat when he was 19. In 1999 my wife and I accompanied him, his wife and his then young son back to Viet Nam for an amazing and healing two weeks. His son, Andy, is now a film maker who has just returned from Saigon after having shot a new film. However, he needs a little more money to finish the post production work. So this request goes out to anyone who can help my “nephew”, Andy Nguyen, complete his film. I will be eternally grateful for any help you can provide.

FOREVER IN HIATUS from FOREVER IN HIATUS on Vimeo.

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Why Gaming Is So Important … TED Talk

I’ve felt that this was true for several years now, but this is the first time I have found such a convincing talk backing up my hunch.

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An Inspiration … time for some good news/feelings

This is probably the first time I’ve ever posted anything positive about the FOX television network, but this audition for their new talent show really blew me away. With all that is going on with the Occupy movement, it all comes down to us 99%. And here is a 99%er that we can all be proud of on many levels.

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Mohammed Bouazizi, hero of our age!

(Rebecca Solnit, Tomdispatch, October 19, 2011)
[CLICK the above credit line for the full article]

Dear young man who died on the fourth day of this turbulent 2011, dear Mohammed Bouazizi, . . . I want to write you about an astonishing year — with three months yet to run. I want to tell you about the power of despair and the margins of hope and the bonds of civil society. . . . I wish you could see the way that your small life and large death became a catalyst for the fall of so many dictators in what is known as the Arab Spring. . . . We are now in some sort of an American Fall. Civil society here has suddenly hit the ground running, and we are all headed toward a future no one imagined when you, a young Tunisian vegetable seller capable of giving so much, who instead had so much taken from you, burned yourself to death to protest your impoverished and humiliated state. . . . You lit yourself on fire on December 17, 2010, exactly nine months before Occupy Wall Street began. Your death two weeks later would be the beginning of so much. You lit yourself on fire because you were voiceless, powerless, and evidently without hope. And yet you must have had one small hope left: that your death would have an impact; that you, who had so few powers, even the power to make a decent living or protect your modest possessions or be treated fairly and decently by the police, had the power to protest. As it turned out, you had that power beyond your wildest dreams, and you had it because your hope, however diminished, was the dream of the many, the dream of what we now have started calling the 99%. . . . Its earliest critics seemed to think that Occupy Wall Street was a lobbying group whose chosen task on this planet should be to create a package of realistic demands. In other words, they were convinced that the occupiers should become supplicants, asking the powerful for some kind of handout like college debt forgiveness. They were suggesting that a dream as wide as the sky be stuffed into little bottles and put up for sale. Or simply smashed. . . . In the same way, they wanted this movement to hurry up and appoint leaders, so that there would be someone to single out and investigate, pick off, or corrupt. At heart, however, this is a leaderless movement, an anarchist movement, catalyzed by the grace of civil society and the hard work of the collective. The Occupy movement — like so many movements around the world now — is using general assemblies as its form of protest and process. Its members are not facing the authorities, but each other, coming to know themselves, trying to give rise to the democracy they desire on a small scale rather than merely railing against its absence on a large scale. . . . The beauty and the genius of this movement in this moment is that it has found a way to define its needs and desires without putting limits on them that would automatically exclude so many. In doing so, it has spoken to nearly all of us. . . . 

At this moment in history, occupation should be everyone’s occupation.

 

 

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Burning Man As You’ve Never Seen It Before

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Here Is What Occupy Wall Street Demonstrators Want

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The Leading Edge of Human Evolution

If you have ever been to a festival you’ll most definitely will want to watch this video. And if you’ve never been to an outdoor music/dance/art/incredible festival you most definitely will want to watch this video. … This is about the leading edge of human evolution! I’ve seen a lot of TED talks, but this is one of the most important and my new favorite.

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I love surfing videos … esp. introduced by McKenna

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Psychedelics are more of a window rather than a door

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Burning Man 2011 from a Hot Air Balloon

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